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战俘营里孕育的爱国主义 – 译学馆
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战俘营里孕育的爱国主义

Why I love a country that once betrayed me | George Takei

我是进取号星际飞船的老兵
I’m a veteran of the starship Enterprise.
我在银河系间遨游
I soared through the galaxy
驾驶着巨型的星际飞船
driving a huge starship
带领着来自世界各地的船员
with a crew made up of people from all over this world,
很多不同种族 不同文化
many different races, many different cultures,
不同传统的人
many different heritages,
同心协力
all working together,
共同探索未知的新世界
and our mission was to explore strange new worlds,
寻找新的生命和文明
to seek out new life and new civilizations,
向着宇宙洪荒大胆前进
to boldly go where no one has gone before.
好了—
Well —
[掌声]
[Applause] —
我是日本移民的子孙
I am the grandson of immigrants from Japan
我的祖父母来到美国
who went to America,
勇敢地闯入一个陌生的新世界
boldly going to a strange new world,
寻找新的机会
seeking new opportunities.
我的母亲出生在加利福尼亚州萨格拉门托市
My mother was born in Sacramento, California.
我的父亲是旧金山人
My father was a San Franciscan.
他们在洛杉矶相遇并结婚
They met and married in Los Angeles,
我就在那里出生
and I was born there.
在我4岁的那年
I was four years old
也就是1941年的12月7日 日本轰炸了珍珠港
when Pearl Harbor was bombed on December 7, 1941 by Japan,
一夜之间 全世界陷入世界大战
and overnight, the world was plunged into a world war.
突然之间 愤怒的气氛在美国席卷开来
America suddenly was swept up by hysteria.
日裔美国人
Japanese-Americans,
日本人后裔的美国公民
American citizens of Japanese ancestry,
遭受着怀疑和恐惧
were looked on with suspicion and fear
以及赤裸裸的仇恨
and with outright hatred
只是因为我们碰巧长得像
simply because we happened to look like
轰炸珍珠港的那些人
the people that bombed Pearl Harbor.
愤怒的情绪在不断增长
And the hysteria grew and grew
直到1942年2月
until in February 1942,
美国总统 富兰克林·德拉诺·罗斯福
the president of the United States,Franklin Delano Roosevelt,
下令将所有美国西海岸的日裔美国人
ordered all Japanese-Americans on the West Coast of America
抓捕并集中看守
to be summarily rounded up
没有罪名 没有审判
with no charges, with no trial,
未经正当程序
with no due process.
正当程序 是我们司法体制的核心
Due process, this is a core pillar of our justice system.
而这些都消失了
That all disappeared.
我们被集中起来
We were to be rounded up
被监禁在10个铁丝网围绕的战俘集中营
and imprisoned in 10 barbed-wire prison camps
它们都位于美国最偏远的地区
in some of the most desolate places in America:
亚利桑那州酷热的沙漠
the blistering hot desert of Arizona,
阿肯色州潮湿的沼泽
the sultry swamps of Arkansas,
怀俄明 爱达荷 犹他和科罗拉多州的不毛之地
the wastelands of Wyoming, Idaho, Utah, Colorado,
还有两个位于加利福尼亚州最荒凉的地带
and two of the most desolate places in California.
4月20日 是我5周岁的生日
On April 20th, I celebrated my fifth birthday,
过完生日的几周后
and just a few weeks after my birthday,
我的父母把我弟弟 妹妹和我
my parents got my younger brother, my baby sister and me
很早就叫起来
up very early one morning,
匆忙给我们穿上衣服
and they dressed us hurriedly.
我和弟弟坐在客厅里 从窗户向外看
My brother and I were in the living roomlooking out the front window,
我们看到两名士兵走到门前的车道
and we saw two soldiers marching up our driveway.
他们的步枪上装着刺刀
They carried bayonets on their rifles.
他们走过门廊
They stomped up the front porch
大力地敲门
and banged on the door.
我的父亲打开门
My father answered it,
士兵命令我们离开家
and the soldiers ordered us out of our home.
父亲给我和弟弟一人一个小箱子
My father gave my brother and me small luggages to carry,
我们走出来 站在车道上
and we walked out and stood on the driveway
等着妈妈出来
waiting for our mother to come out,
最终当我的母亲走出来的时候
and when my mother finally came out,
她一只手抱着妹妹
she had our baby sister in one arm,
另一只手拿着一个大袋子
a huge duffel bag in the other,
脸颊上挂满了眼泪
and tears were streaming down both her cheeks.
我永远忘不了那一幕
I will never be able to forget that scene.
它深深地烙印在我的记忆中
It is burned into my memory.
我们被从家里带走
We were taken from our home
上了一列火车
and loaded on to train cars
车上还有其他日裔美国人家庭
with other Japanese-American families.
每节车厢两端都有士兵把守
There were guards stationed at both ends of each car,
好像我们是罪犯似的
as if we were criminals.
我们被带着横跨了这个国家三分之二的距离
We were taken two thirds ofthe way across the country,
在摇摇晃晃的车厢中度过了四天三夜
rocking on that train for four days and three nights,
最终来到阿肯色州的沼泽地带
to the swamps of Arkansas.
我依然记得环绕四周的铁丝网
I still remember the barbed wirefence that confined me.
我依旧记得高高的哨兵塔
I remember the tall sentry tower
上面架设的机枪瞄准着我们
with the machine guns pointed at us.
我依旧记得晚上我从兵营跑到厕所时
I remember the searchlight that followed me
探照灯始终照射着我
when I made the night runs from my barrack to the latrine.
但是对于5岁的我来说
But to five-year-old me,
我觉得这还挺不错的
I thought it was kind of nice
因为他们在我去尿尿时 还帮我照亮前面的路
that they’d lit the way for me to pee.
当时我只是个孩子 还不能理解我周围的环境
I was a child, too young to understand the circumstances of my being there.
孩子们的适应能力惊人
Children are amazingly adaptable.
这些极为反常的安排
What would be grotesquely abnormal
反倒成为我在战俘营中
became my normality
习以为常的日常生活
in the prisoner of war camps.
我习惯了每天三次的列队
It became routine for me to line up three times a day
习惯了在嘈杂的食堂中吃恶心的食物
to eat lousy food in a noisy mess hall.
习惯了和父亲一起在大澡堂里集体洗澡
It became normal for me to go with my fatherto bathe in a mass shower.
在一个监狱中 一个铁丝网环绕的战俘集中营里
Being in a prison, a barbed-wire prison camp,
这都是我的日常生活
became my normality.
当战争结束的时候 我们也被释放了
When the war ended, we were released,
每个人领到一张单程车票
and given a one-way ticket
可以前往美国的任何地方
to anywhere in the United States.
我的父母决定回到洛杉矶的家
My parents decided to go back home to Los Angeles,
当那时的洛杉矶并不友好
but Los Angeles was not a welcoming place.
我们身无分文
We were penniless.
我们的一切都被抢走了
Everything had been taken from us,
周围的敌意还非常明显
and the hostility was intense.
我们第一个落脚地是
Our first home was on Skid Row
城市最下层的贫民窟
in the lowest part of our city,
与流浪汉 醉鬼
living with derelicts,
和疯子们住在一起
drunkards and crazy people,
街道 小巷和走廊中
the stench of urine all over,
到处弥漫着排泄物的臭气
on the street, in the alley, in the hallway.
那是一段恐怖的经历
It was a horrible experience,
对我们孩子来说 更是恐怖至极
and for us kids, it was terrorizing.
我记得有一次
I remember once
一个醉汉踉踉跄跄地走过来
a drunkard came staggering down,
就在我们眼前跌倒 吐了一地
fell down right in front of us, and threw up.
我的妹妹说 妈妈 我们回家吧
My baby sister said,”Mama, let’s go back home.”
因为她觉得铁丝网里 才是为我们的家
because behind barbed wires was for us, home.
我的父母辛苦劳作来养活一家人
My parents worked hard to get back on their feet.
我们已经失去了一切
We had lost everything.
他们在中年时期
They were at the middle of their lives
一切重新开始
and starting all over.
他们拼命地工作
They worked their fingers to the bone,
最终
and ultimately
我们挣够足够的钱
they were able to get the capital together
在一个不错的街区
to buy a three-bedroom home
买下一间有三个卧室的房子
in a nice neighborhood.
那时候我十几岁
And I was a teenager,
对童年时的监禁生活仍旧非常好奇
and I became very curious about my childhood imprisonment.
我阅读了公民教育手册
I had read civics books that told me about
其中提到美国民主的理念
the ideals of American democracy.
人人生而平等
All men are created equal,
我们有不可剥夺的
we have an inalienable right
生活 自由和追求幸福的权利
to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness,
这与我童年监禁生活的经历判若云泥
and I couldn’t quite make that fit with what I knew to be my childhood imprisonment.
我遍阅历史书籍
I read history books,
却找不到关于这件事的任何叙述
and I couldn’t find anything about it.
于是我在晚饭后找到父亲
And so I engaged my father after dinner
与他进行长时间的 有时甚至是激烈的讨论
in long, sometimes heated conversations.
我们进行过很多很多这样的讨论
We had many, many conversations like that,
从中我收获了
and what I got from them
父亲的智慧
was my father’s wisdom.
他在监禁期间
He was the one that suffered the most
遭受的苦难最深
under those conditions of imprisonment,
但他依然理解美国的民主
and yet he understood American democracy.
他告诉我 我们的民主是人民的民主
He told me that our democracy is a people’s democracy,
人民有多强大 它就有多强大
and it can be as great as the people can be,
但它也会像人一样会犯错误
but it is also as fallible as people are.
他告诉我 美国的民主
He told me that American democracy
主要取决于那些善良的人
is vitally dependent on good people
他们珍视我们体制的理念
who cherish the ideals of our system
积极地推动民主的发展
and actively engage in the process of making our democracy work.
他把我带到一个竞选总部
And he took me to a campaign headquarters
伊利诺伊州长正在竞选总统
the governor of Illinois was running for the presidency
让我开始接触美国选举政治
and introduced me to American electoral politics.
他还告诉我
And he also told me about
年轻的日裔美国人在二战中的故事
young Japanese-Americans during the Second World War.
珍珠港遭到轰炸之后
When Pearl Harbor was bombed,
日裔美国青年像其他美国青年一样
young Japanese-Americans, like all young Americans,
纷纷前往征兵处
rushed to their draft board
志愿为祖国而战
to volunteer to fight for our country.
这股爱国的热情
That act of patriotism
却遭到了当头一棒
was answered with a slap in the face.
我们被拒绝入伍
We were denied service,
我们被划分为为非外籍敌人
and categorized as enemy, non-alien.
当你志愿为祖国而战时
It was outrageous to be called an “enemy”
“敌人”这个称呼让人愤怒
when you’re volunteering to fight for your country,
然而和它一起的还有“非外籍”
but that was compounded with the word “non-alien”,
这个词的含义恰恰是
which is a word that means
“公民”的对立面
“citizen” in the negative.
他们甚至连“公民”这个词都从我们这夺走了
They even took the word “citizen” away from us,
还监禁了我们一年
and imprisoned them for a whole year.
之后 政府意识到战争期间人手匮乏
And then the government realized that there’s a wartime manpower shortage,
然后他们就像当初突然把我们抓起来一样
and as suddenly as they’d rounded us up,
现在又突然向日裔美国青年敞开了入伍的大门
they opened up the military for service by young Japanese-Americans.
多么荒谬可笑
It was totally irrational,
但神奇的
but the amazing thing,
令人震惊的是
the astounding thing,
成千上万的日裔美国青年男女
is that thousands of young Japanese-American men and women
再从铁丝网后走出
again went from behind those barbed-wire fences,
穿上与守卫同样的制服
put on the same uniform as that of our guards,
离开还在被监禁的家人
leaving their families in imprisonment,
为祖国而战
to fight for this country.
他们说 他们参与战斗
They said that they were going to fight
不仅仅是为了让家人走出铁丝网
not only to get their families out from behind those barbed-wire fences,
还因为他们坚信政府所要捍卫的理念
but because they cherished the very ideal of what our government stands for,
政府应该捍卫却一度因目前行为而抛弃的理念
should stand for, and that was being abrogated by what was being done.
人人生而平等
All men are created equal.
于是他们挺身而出 为祖国而战
And they went to fight for this country.
他们被安排在一个完全由日裔美国人组成的部队
They were put into a segregated all Japanese-American unit
然后被送往欧洲战场
and sent to the battlefields of Europe,
他们投身战争
and they threw themselves into it.
以异乎寻常的勇气和毅力作战
They fought with amazing,incredible courage and valor.
他们被派往执行最危险的任务
They were sent out on the most dangerous missions
他们的伤亡率在各作战部队中位居第一
and they sustained the highest combat casualty rate of any unit proportionally.
有一场战役证明了这一点
There is one battle that illustrates that.
那是哥特防线的一场战役
It was a battle for the Gothic Line.
德国人驻扎在一个山坡的一侧
The Germans were embedded in this mountain hillside,
一面是高耸的峭壁 一面是坚不可摧的山洞
rocky hillside, in impregnable caves,
三个盟军营
and three allied battalions
已经连续进攻了6个月
had been pounding away at it for six months,
双方陷入僵局
and they were stalemated.
442营得到命令加入这场战斗
The 442nd was called in to add to the fight,
442营的士兵想出了一个独特的
but the men of the 442nd came up with a unique
而又极为危险的策略
but dangerous idea:
山的后面是岩石峭壁
The backside of the mountain was a sheer rock cliff.
德国人认为对方绝不可能从后面发动进攻
The Germans thought an attack from the backside would be impossible.
442营的士兵决定把不可能变成可能
The men of the 442nd decided to do the impossible.
在一个伸手不见五指的夜晚
On a dark, moonless night,
他们开始攀登峭壁
they began scaling that rock wall,
峭壁的高度超过1000英尺
a drop of more than 1,000 feet,
全副武装的士兵
in full combat gear.
花了整整一晚
They climbed all night long
攀登这座峭壁
on that sheer cliff.
在黑暗中 一些人由于失手
In the darkness, some lost their handhold
或者失足跌入下面的深渊坠亡
or their footing and they fell to their deathsin the ravine below.
他们寂静无声地坠落
They all fell silently.
没有一声叫喊
Not a single one cried out,
以免暴露行踪
so as not to give their position away.
士兵们足足攀爬了8个小时
The men climbed for eight hours straight,
那些到达顶部的人
and those who made it to the top
等待着清晨的第一缕阳光
stayed there until the first break of light,
破晓时分
and as soon as light broke,
他们发动了进攻
they attacked.
德国人惊呆了
The Germans were surprised,
他们占领了山头 突破了哥特防线
and they took the hill and broke the Gothic Line.
6个月的僵局
A six-month stalemate
被442营在32分钟内打破
was broken by the 442nd in 32 minutes.
这是一次极为成功的行动
It was an amazing act,
战争结束后
and when the war ended,
442营回到美国
the 442nd returned to the United States
他们是二战中
as the most decorated unit
功勋最为显著的部队
of the entire Second World War.
他们在白宫前 得到杜鲁门总统的接见
They were greeted back on the White House Lawn by President Truman,
他说:
who said to them,
“你们不仅打败了敌人 更是战胜了世俗的偏见。”
“You fought not only the enemy, but prejudice, and you won.”
他们是我心目中的英雄
They are my heroes.
他们为了这个国家闪亮的理念
They clung to their belief
爬上了峭壁
in the shining ideals of this country,
他们证明 美国人的称号
and they proved that being an American
不仅仅属于某部分人
is not just for some people,
美国人并不是一个种族的名称
that race is not how we define being an American.
他们重新定义了美国人的概念
They expanded what it means to be an American,
其中也包括了那些被人怀疑和仇恨的日裔美国人
including Japanese-Americans that were feared and suspected and hated.
他们促成了未来的变化
They were change agents,
他们给我留下了丰厚的精神财富
and they left for me a legacy.
他们是我的英雄 我的父亲是我的英雄
They are my heroes and my father is my hero,
那些了解民主含义的英雄们引导我走出迷惘
who understood democracy and guided me through it.
他们留给我的宝贵精神财富
They gave me a legacy,
让我形成了一种责任感
and with that legacy comes a responsibility,
我下定决心
and I am dedicated
我要让我的国家成为更好的美国
to making my country an even better America,
要让我们的政府
to making our government
变得真正民主
an even truer democracy,
这一信念来自于我的英雄们
and because of the heroes that I have
以及我们经历的那些苦难
and the struggles that we’ve gone through,
我可以作为一个日裔美国同胞站在你们的面前
I can stand before you as a gay Japanese-American,
更重要的是
but even more than that,
我是一个自豪的美国人
I am a proud American.
非常感谢
Thank you very much.
[掌声]
[Applause]

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译制信息
视频概述

演讲者幼年时,恰值日本偷袭珍珠港,于是被当做战俘关押一年,因而对美国民主产生怀疑。后因父亲及多位日裔美国英雄的事迹走出迷惘,进而热爱美国,因自己是美国人而自豪。

听录译者

收集自网络

翻译译者

Lost.

审核员

审核员AL

视频来源

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LeBKBFAPwNc

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